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When Does Drinking Become A Drink Problem?

Last updated on October 8, 2020

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We all know that overdoing it on the booze can cause us problems, right? But at the same time, while some substances are criminalized and demonized by society, alcohol is largely accepted and embraced. Studies will show health benefits of a single glass of a wine each day even!

So a regular beer or glass or wine is something many of us enjoy. But how regularly is twoo regularly? And what are the signs that alcohol might be becoming a problem for you?

Frequently Going Over The Recommended Limit

In the UK, the NHS recommend that you avoid drinking over 14 units per week regularly and that you should also spread this over 3 or more days (not all 14 units in a single day).

To give that some context, in a weak beer (or say 3.6%) there’s two units per pint.

If you find yourself frequently going over the recommended intake, this could cause a health problem.

Drinking When You Shouldn’t

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If you drink at times you shouldn’t then this is clearly problematic. So drinking when you have to drive soon or drinking when you’re working, for example. It’s time then to ask yourself why. And if the reason is that you’re struggling to cope without alcohol even at these times, then a sensible approach would be to seek help.

You Crave Alcohol

If you’re finding you feel physically compelled to have a drink regularly then you might want to consider the possibility of alcohol addiction and seeking out some help.

Alcohol should be something you enjoy but never something you need.

Finding Yourself Unable To Have Fun Without It

Alcohol helps us relax and lower our inhibitions. So it’s no surprise that many people find they have more fun when drinking. But if you find yourself completely unable to have fun unless you’ve had a drink, it might be time to assess the situation.

Where To Get Help

If you are concerned you might have an alcohol problem you can get in touch with your GP or https://alcoholchange.org.uk/

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